The tiger by william blakepoem analysis

the lamb william blake analysis

What the anvil? Comparing the creator to a blacksmith, he ponders about the anvil and the furnace that the project would have required and the smith who could have wielded them. The use of the first stanza as a refrain repeating it with the difference of one word dare at the end is also for special emphasis on its symbolism.

And when thy heart began to beat, What dread hand? As previously mentioned, the final stanza is nearly identical to the first stanza save for the change of a single word— "could" is replaced with "dare.

It also continues from the first description of the tiger the imagery of fire with its simultaneous connotations of creation, purification, and destruction.

Tyger Tyger burning bright, In the forests of the night: What immortal hand or eye, Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?

the tyger william blake analysis line by line

The sentiment is so much so that only an "immortal hand" can frame, in other words handle or contain, the "fearful symmetry" of the Tyger. Summary There are many questions posed in the somewhat concise poem by William Blake titled "The Tyger.

The tyger william blake questions and answers

An allegorical reference to blacksmith, he hypothesizes some intelligent creator developing his creation akin to a blacksmith as he cuts, hammers and forms metal after considerable toil. And what shoulder, and what art Could twist the sinews of thy heart? However, in these two lines it seems the creator has a "dread grasp" that dares to hold on to the "deadly terrors" of the Tyger. Tyger Tyger burning bright, In the forests of the night: What immortal hand or eye, Dare frame thy fearful symmetry? What the anvil? Tyger Tyger burning bright, In the forests of the night: What immortal hand or eye, Dare frame thy fearful symmetry? Religion comes into play by bringing in the question of creation while pointing to the Christian God, the maker of the Lamb, as the same creator spoken of throughout this poem. In the third line, the poet wonders would God have smiled after creating Tiger as it was beyond words for Satanic forces. These tools are used by the iron-smith to create solid and heavy items. He wonders which hammer, chain, anvil and furnace the Creator would have used to create the brain of the tiger. The second quatrain opens up with the mention of the "deeps" and the "skies", bringing up high and low. What the hand, dare seize the fire? What the hammer? Once again the word "dread" is used. Summary There are many questions posed in the somewhat concise poem by William Blake titled "The Tyger.

What does it mean? These words have been reiterated from above.

Simple summary of the tyger by william blake

On what wings dare he aspire? The qualities of the original and pure man must be freed by using this tiger- like force of the soul. Form The poem is comprised of six quatrains in rhymed couplets. And when thy heart began to beat, What dread hand? The Lamb of God is a very well known symbol of Jesus, meaning the speaker is wondering if the same God created both. On what wings dare he aspire? As the poem leads on gradually, the poem clearly makes it a point to discuss God as an entity as opposed to the tyger. However, in these two lines it seems the creator has a "dread grasp" that dares to hold on to the "deadly terrors" of the Tyger. This is a question of creative responsibility and of will, and the poet carefully includes this moral question with the consideration of physical power. Indeed, we might take such an analysis further and see the duality between the lamb and the tiger as being specifically about the two versions of God in Christianity: the vengeful and punitive Old Testament God, Yahweh, and the meek and forgiving God presented in the New Testament. The simplicity and neat proportions of the poems form perfectly suit its regular structure, in which a string of questions all contribute to the articulation of a single, central idea.

So, in the first two lines, he appreciates the fire and in the 3rd and 4th lines, he appreciates the Wings and Hands of the Creator. As apparent, the sublime characteristic refers to an entity extremely big and powerful yet mysterious. It also represents the double potentials in any human being.

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The Tyger by William Blake: Summary and Critical Analysis